HBase Shell Commands Cheat Sheet

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HBase Shell commands are broken down into 13 groups to interact with HBase Database via HBase shell, let’s see usage, syntax, description, and examples of each in this article. From the below tables, the first table describes groups and all its commands in a cheat sheet and the remaining tables provide the detail description of each group and its commands.

HBase Shell Commands by Group

On the below table click on links to check usage, description, and examples for each HBase shell group or commands. You can also get the usage of each by running help ‘<command>’ | ‘<group-name>’ or just entering command name without parameters on the HBase shell.

If you do not have HBase setup and running on your system, I would recommend to have the setup and start using the Hbase shell.

While trying these commands, make sure table names, rows, columns all enclosed in quote characters.

Group NameHBase Shell Commands
generalstatus, table_help, version, whoami
ddlalter, alter_async, alter_status, create, describe, disable, disable_all, drop, drop_all,enable , enable_all, exists, get_table, is_disabled, is_enabled, list, locate_region, show_filters
namespacealter_namespace, create_namespace, describe_namespace, drop_namespace, list_namespace,list_namespace_tables
dmlappend, count, delete, deleteall, get, get_counter, get_splits, incr, put, scan, truncate, truncate_preserve
toolsassign, balance_switch, balancer, balancer_enabled, catalogjanitor_enabled, catalogjanitor_run, catalogjanitor_switch, close_region, compact, compact_mob, compact_rs, flush, major_compact, major_compact_mob, merge_region, move, normalizer_enabled, normalize, normalizer_switch, split, trace, unassign, wal_roll, zk_dump
replicationadd_peer, append_peer_tableCFs, disable_peer, disable_table_replication, enable_peer, enable_table_replication, get_peer_config, list_peer_configs, list_peers, list_replicated_tables, remove_peer, remove_peer_tableCFs, set_peer_tableCFs, show_peer_tableCFs, update_peer_config
snapshotsclone_snapshot, delete_all_snapshot, delete_snapshot, list_snapshots, restore_snapshot, snapshot
configurationupdate_all_config, update_config
quotaslist_quotas, set_quota
securitygrant, list_security_capabilities, revoke, user_permission
proceduresabort_procedure, list_procedures
visibility labelsadd_labels, clear_auths, get_auths, list_labels, set_auths, set_visibility
rsgroupadd_rsgroup, balance_rsgroup, get_rsgroup, get_server_rsgroup, get_table_rsgroup, list_rsgroups, move_servers_rsgroup, move_tables_rsgroup, remove_rsgroup

HBase General Shell Commands

These shell commands are commonly used to identify the version, status, of the database.

NameGeneral HBase Shell Commands Usage

status

1 active master, 1 backup masters, 22 servers, 0 dead, 221.8182 average load

version

1.2.0-cdh5.14.4, rUnknown, Tue Jun 12 04:00:36 PDT 2018

whoami

Returns account and group information

Data Manipulation Language (DML) Shell Commands

DML HBase shell commands include most commonly used commands to modify the data, for example, put – is used to insert the rows to the tables, get & scan – are used to retrieve the data, delete & truncate – are used to delete the data, append – is used to append the cells and there are many commands

CommandUsage & Examples

append

Appends a cell 'value' at specified table/row/column coordinates.

hbase> append 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 'value', ATTRIBUTES=>{'mykey'=>'myvalue'}
hbase> append 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 'value', {VISIBILITY=>'PRIVATE|SECRET'}

The same commands also can be run on a table reference. Suppose you had a reference
t to table 't1', the corresponding command would be:

hbase> t.append 'r1', 'c1', 'value', ATTRIBUTES=>{'mykey'=>'myvalue'}
hbase> t.append 'r1', 'c1', 'value', {VISIBILITY=>'PRIVATE|SECRET'}

count

Count the number of rows in a table. Return value is the number of rows.
This operation may take a LONG time (Run '$HADOOP_HOME/bin/hadoop jar
hbase.jar rowcount' to run a counting mapreduce job). Current count is shown
every 1000 rows by default. Count interval may be optionally specified. Scan
caching is enabled on count scans by default. Default cache size is 10 rows.
If your rows are small in size, you may want to increase this
parameter. Examples:

hbase> count 'ns1:t1'
hbase> count 't1'
hbase> count 't1', INTERVAL => 100000
hbase> count 't1', CACHE => 1000
hbase> count 't1', INTERVAL => 10, CACHE => 1000

The same commands also can be run on a table reference. Suppose you had a reference
t to table 't1', the corresponding commands would be:

hbase> t.count
hbase> t.count INTERVAL => 100000
hbase> t.count CACHE => 1000
hbase> t.count INTERVAL => 10, CACHE => 1000

delete

Put a delete cell value at specified table/row/column and optionally
timestamp coordinates. Deletes must match the deleted cell's
coordinates exactly. When scanning, a delete cell suppresses older
versions. To delete a cell from 't1' at row 'r1' under column 'c1'
marked with the time 'ts1', do:

hbase> delete 'ns1:t1', 'r1', 'c1', ts1
hbase> delete 't1', 'r1', 'c1', ts1
hbase> delete 't1', 'r1', 'c1', ts1, {VISIBILITY=>'PRIVATE|SECRET'}

The same command can also be run on a table reference. Suppose you had a reference
t to table 't1', the corresponding command would be:

hbase> t.delete 'r1', 'c1', ts1
hbase> t.delete 'r1', 'c1', ts1, {VISIBILITY=>'PRIVATE|SECRET'}

deleteall

Delete all cells in a given row; pass a table name, row, and optionally
a column and timestamp. Examples:

hbase> deleteall 'ns1:t1', 'r1'
hbase> deleteall 't1', 'r1'
hbase> deleteall 't1', 'r1', 'c1'
hbase> deleteall 't1', 'r1', 'c1', ts1
hbase> deleteall 't1', 'r1', 'c1', ts1, {VISIBILITY=>'PRIVATE|SECRET'}

The same commands also can be run on a table reference. Suppose you had a reference
t to table 't1', the corresponding command would be:

hbase> t.deleteall 'r1'
hbase> t.deleteall 'r1', 'c1'
hbase> t.deleteall 'r1', 'c1', ts1
hbase> t.deleteall 'r1', 'c1', ts1, {VISIBILITY=>'PRIVATE|SECRET'}

get

Get row or cell contents; pass table name, row, and optionally
a dictionary of column(s), timestamp, timerange and versions. Examples:

hbase> get 'ns1:t1', 'r1'
hbase> get 't1', 'r1'
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', {TIMERANGE => [ts1, ts2]}
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', {COLUMN => 'c1'}
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', {COLUMN => ['c1', 'c2', 'c3']}
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', {COLUMN => 'c1', TIMESTAMP => ts1}
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', {COLUMN => 'c1', TIMERANGE => [ts1, ts2], VERSIONS => 4}
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', {COLUMN => 'c1', TIMESTAMP => ts1, VERSIONS => 4}
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', {FILTER => "ValueFilter(=, 'binary:abc')"}
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', 'c1'
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 'c2'
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', ['c1', 'c2']
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', {COLUMN => 'c1', ATTRIBUTES => {'mykey'=>'myvalue'}}
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', {COLUMN => 'c1', AUTHORIZATIONS => ['PRIVATE','SECRET']}
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', {CONSISTENCY => 'TIMELINE'}
hbase> get 't1', 'r1', {CONSISTENCY => 'TIMELINE', REGION_REPLICA_ID => 1}

Besides the default 'toStringBinary' format, 'get' also supports custom formatting by
column. A user can define a FORMATTER by adding it to the column name in the get
specification. The FORMATTER can be stipulated:

1. either as a org.apache.hadoop.hbase.util.Bytes method name (e.g, toInt, toString)
2. or as a custom class followed by method name: e.g. 'c(MyFormatterClass).format'.

Example formatting cf:qualifier1 and cf:qualifier2 both as Integers:
hbase> get 't1', 'r1' {COLUMN => ['cf:qualifier1:toInt',
'cf:qualifier2:c(org.apache.hadoop.hbase.util.Bytes).toInt'] }

Note that you can specify a FORMATTER by column only (cf:qualifier). You cannot specify
a FORMATTER for all columns of a column family.

The same commands also can be run on a reference to a table (obtained via get_table or
create_table). Suppose you had a reference t to table 't1', the corresponding commands
would be:

hbase> t.get 'r1'
hbase> t.get 'r1', {TIMERANGE => [ts1, ts2]}
hbase> t.get 'r1', {COLUMN => 'c1'}
hbase> t.get 'r1', {COLUMN => ['c1', 'c2', 'c3']}
hbase> t.get 'r1', {COLUMN => 'c1', TIMESTAMP => ts1}
hbase> t.get 'r1', {COLUMN => 'c1', TIMERANGE => [ts1, ts2], VERSIONS => 4}
hbase> t.get 'r1', {COLUMN => 'c1', TIMESTAMP => ts1, VERSIONS => 4}
hbase> t.get 'r1', {FILTER => "ValueFilter(=, 'binary:abc')"}
hbase> t.get 'r1', 'c1'
hbase> t.get 'r1', 'c1', 'c2'
hbase> t.get 'r1', ['c1', 'c2']
hbase> t.get 'r1', {CONSISTENCY => 'TIMELINE'}
hbase> t.get 'r1', {CONSISTENCY => 'TIMELINE', REGION_REPLICA_ID => 1}

get_counter

Return a counter cell value at specified table/row/column coordinates.
A counter cell should be managed with atomic increment functions on HBase
and the data should be binary encoded (as long value). Example:

hbase> get_counter 'ns1:t1', 'r1', 'c1'
hbase> get_counter 't1', 'r1', 'c1'

The same commands also can be run on a table reference. Suppose you had a reference
t to table 't1', the corresponding command would be:

hbase> t.get_counter 'r1', 'c1'

get_splits

Get the splits of the named table:
hbase> get_splits 't1'
hbase> get_splits 'ns1:t1'

The same commands also can be run on a table reference. Suppose you had a reference
t to table 't1', the corresponding command would be:

hbase> t.get_splits

incr

Increments a cell 'value' at specified table/row/column coordinates.
To increment a cell value in table 'ns1:t1' or 't1' at row 'r1' under column
'c1' by 1 (can be omitted) or 10 do:

hbase> incr 'ns1:t1', 'r1', 'c1'
hbase> incr 't1', 'r1', 'c1'
hbase> incr 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 1
hbase> incr 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 10
hbase> incr 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 10, {ATTRIBUTES=>{'mykey'=>'myvalue'}}
hbase> incr 't1', 'r1', 'c1', {ATTRIBUTES=>{'mykey'=>'myvalue'}}
hbase> incr 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 10, {VISIBILITY=>'PRIVATE|SECRET'}

The same commands also can be run on a table reference. Suppose you had a reference
t to table 't1', the corresponding command would be:

hbase> t.incr 'r1', 'c1'
hbase> t.incr 'r1', 'c1', 1
hbase> t.incr 'r1', 'c1', 10, {ATTRIBUTES=>{'mykey'=>'myvalue'}}
hbase> t.incr 'r1', 'c1', 10, {VISIBILITY=>'PRIVATE|SECRET'}

put

Put a cell 'value' at specified table/row/column and optionally
timestamp coordinates. To put a cell value into table 'ns1:t1' or 't1'
at row 'r1' under column 'c1' marked with the time 'ts1', do:

hbase> put 'ns1:t1', 'r1', 'c1', 'value'
hbase> put 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 'value'
hbase> put 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 'value', ts1
hbase> put 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 'value', {ATTRIBUTES=>{'mykey'=>'myvalue'}}
hbase> put 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 'value', ts1, {ATTRIBUTES=>{'mykey'=>'myvalue'}}
hbase> put 't1', 'r1', 'c1', 'value', ts1, {VISIBILITY=>'PRIVATE|SECRET'}

The same commands also can be run on a table reference. Suppose you had a reference
t to table 't1', the corresponding command would be:

hbase> t.put 'r1', 'c1', 'value', ts1, {ATTRIBUTES=>{'mykey'=>'myvalue'}}

scan

Scan a table; pass table name and optionally a dictionary of scanner
specifications. Scanner specifications may include one or more of:
TIMERANGE, FILTER, LIMIT, STARTROW, STOPROW, ROWPREFIXFILTER, TIMESTAMP,
MAXLENGTH or COLUMNS, CACHE or RAW, VERSIONS, ALL_METRICS or METRICS

If no columns are specified, all columns will be scanned.
To scan all members of a column family, leave the qualifier empty as in
'col_family'.

The filter can be specified in two ways:
1. Using a filterString - more information on this is available in the
Filter Language document attached to the HBASE-4176 JIRA
2. Using the entire package name of the filter.

If you wish to see metrics regarding the execution of the scan, the
ALL_METRICS boolean should be set to true. Alternatively, if you would
prefer to see only a subset of the metrics, the METRICS array can be
defined to include the names of only the metrics you care about.

Some examples:

hbase> scan 'hbase:meta'
hbase> scan 'hbase:meta', {COLUMNS => 'info:regioninfo'}
hbase> scan 'ns1:t1', {COLUMNS => ['c1', 'c2'], LIMIT => 10, STARTROW => 'xyz'}
hbase> scan 't1', {COLUMNS => ['c1', 'c2'], LIMIT => 10, STARTROW => 'xyz'}
hbase> scan 't1', {COLUMNS => 'c1', TIMERANGE => [1303668804, 1303668904]}
hbase> scan 't1', {REVERSED => true}
hbase> scan 't1', {ALL_METRICS => true}
hbase> scan 't1', {METRICS => ['RPC_RETRIES', 'ROWS_FILTERED']}
hbase> scan 't1', {ROWPREFIXFILTER => 'row2', FILTER => "
(QualifierFilter (>=, 'binary:xyz')) AND (TimestampsFilter ( 123, 456))"}
hbase> scan 't1', {FILTER =>
org.apache.hadoop.hbase.filter.ColumnPaginationFilter.new(1, 0)}
hbase> scan 't1', {CONSISTENCY => 'TIMELINE'}
For setting the Operation Attributes
hbase> scan 't1', { COLUMNS => ['c1', 'c2'], ATTRIBUTES => {'mykey' => 'myvalue'}}
hbase> scan 't1', { COLUMNS => ['c1', 'c2'], AUTHORIZATIONS => ['PRIVATE','SECRET']}
For experts, there is an additional option -- CACHE_BLOCKS -- which
switches block caching for the scanner on (true) or off (false). By
default it is enabled. Examples:

hbase> scan 't1', {COLUMNS => ['c1', 'c2'], CACHE_BLOCKS => false}

Also for experts, there is an advanced option -- RAW -- which instructs the
scanner to return all cells (including delete markers and uncollected deleted
cells). This option cannot be combined with requesting specific COLUMNS.
Disabled by default. Example:

hbase> scan 't1', {RAW => true, VERSIONS => 10}

Besides the default 'toStringBinary' format, 'scan' supports custom formatting
by column. A user can define a FORMATTER by adding it to the column name in
the scan specification. The FORMATTER can be stipulated:

1. either as a org.apache.hadoop.hbase.util.Bytes method name (e.g, toInt, toString)
2. or as a custom class followed by method name: e.g. 'c(MyFormatterClass).format'.

Example formatting cf:qualifier1 and cf:qualifier2 both as Integers:
hbase> scan 't1', {COLUMNS => ['cf:qualifier1:toInt',
'cf:qualifier2:c(org.apache.hadoop.hbase.util.Bytes).toInt'] }

Note that you can specify a FORMATTER by column only (cf:qualifier). You cannot
specify a FORMATTER for all columns of a column family.

Scan can also be used directly from a table, by first getting a reference to a
table, like such:

hbase> t = get_table 't'
hbase> t.scan

Note in the above situation, you can still provide all the filtering, columns,
options, etc as described above.

truncate

Disables, drops and recreates the specified table.

truncate_preserve

Disables, drops and recreates the specified table while still maintaing the previous region boundaries.

Data Definition Language (DDL) Shell Commands

DDL HBase shell commands are another set of commands used mostly to change the structure of the table, for example, alter – is used to delete column family from a table or any alteration to the table. before you run alter make sure you disable the table first. create – is used to create a table, drop – to drop the table and many more.

CommandUsage & Examples

alter

If the "hbase.online.schema.update.enable" property is set to
false, then the table must be disabled (see help 'disable'). If the
"hbase.online.schema.update.enable" property is set to true, tables can be
altered without disabling them first. Altering enabled tables has caused problems
in the past, so use caution and test it before using in production.

You can use the alter command to add,
modify or delete column families or change table configuration options.
Column families work in a similar way as the 'create' command. The column family
specification can either be a name string, or a dictionary with the NAME attribute.
Dictionaries are described in the output of the 'help' command, with no arguments.

For example, to change or add the 'f1' column family in table 't1' from
current value to keep a maximum of 5 cell VERSIONS, do:

hbase> alter 't1', NAME => 'f1', VERSIONS => 5

You can operate on several column families:

hbase> alter 't1', 'f1', {NAME => 'f2', IN_MEMORY => true}, {NAME => 'f3', VERSIONS => 5}

To delete the 'f1' column family in table 'ns1:t1', use one of:

hbase> alter 'ns1:t1', NAME => 'f1', METHOD => 'delete'
hbase> alter 'ns1:t1', 'delete' => 'f1'

You can also change table-scope attributes like MAX_FILESIZE, READONLY,
MEMSTORE_FLUSHSIZE, DURABILITY, etc. These can be put at the end;
for example, to change the max size of a region to 128MB, do:

hbase> alter 't1', MAX_FILESIZE => '134217728'

You can add a table coprocessor by setting a table coprocessor attribute:

hbase> alter 't1',
'coprocessor'=>'hdfs:///foo.jar|com.foo.FooRegionObserver|1001|arg1=1,arg2=2'

Since you can have multiple coprocessors configured for a table, a
sequence number will be automatically appended to the attribute name
to uniquely identify it.

The coprocessor attribute must match the pattern below in order for
the framework to understand how to load the coprocessor classes:

[coprocessor jar file location] | class name | [priority] | [arguments]

You can also set configuration settings specific to this table or column family:

hbase> alter 't1', CONFIGURATION => {'hbase.hregion.scan.loadColumnFamiliesOnDemand' => 'true'}
hbase> alter 't1', {NAME => 'f2', CONFIGURATION => {'hbase.hstore.blockingStoreFiles' => '10'}}

You can also remove a table-scope attribute:

hbase> alter 't1', METHOD => 'table_att_unset', NAME => 'MAX_FILESIZE'

hbase> alter 't1', METHOD => 'table_att_unset', NAME => 'coprocessor$1'

You can also set REGION_REPLICATION:

hbase> alter 't1', {REGION_REPLICATION => 2}

There could be more than one alteration in one command:

hbase> alter 't1', { NAME => 'f1', VERSIONS => 3 },
{ MAX_FILESIZE => '134217728' }, { METHOD => 'delete', NAME => 'f2' },
OWNER => 'johndoe', METADATA => { 'mykey' => 'myvalue' }

alter_async

Alter column family schema, does not wait for all regions to receive the
schema changes. Pass table name and a dictionary specifying new column
family schema. Dictionaries are described on the main help command output.
Dictionary must include name of column family to alter. For example,

To change or add the 'f1' column family in table 't1' from defaults
to instead keep a maximum of 5 cell VERSIONS, do:

hbase> alter_async 't1', NAME => 'f1', VERSIONS => 5

To delete the 'f1' column family in table 'ns1:t1', do:

hbase> alter_async 'ns1:t1', NAME => 'f1', METHOD => 'delete'

or a shorter version:

hbase> alter_async 'ns1:t1', 'delete' => 'f1'

You can also change table-scope attributes like MAX_FILESIZE
MEMSTORE_FLUSHSIZE, READONLY, and DEFERRED_LOG_FLUSH.

For example, to change the max size of a family to 128MB, do:

hbase> alter 't1', METHOD => 'table_att', MAX_FILESIZE => '134217728'

There could be more than one alteration in one command:

hbase> alter 't1', {NAME => 'f1'}, {NAME => 'f2', METHOD => 'delete'}

To check if all the regions have been updated, use alter_status

alter_status

Get the status of the alter command. Indicates the number of regions of the
table that have received the updated schema
Pass table name.

hbase> alter_status 't1'
hbase> alter_status 'ns1:t1'

create

Creates a table. Pass a table name, and a set of column family
specifications (at least one), and, optionally, table configuration.
Column specification can be a simple string (name), or a dictionary
(dictionaries are described below in main help output), necessarily
including NAME attribute.
Examples:

Create a table with namespace=ns1 and table qualifier=t1
hbase> create 'ns1:t1', {NAME => 'f1', VERSIONS => 5}

Create a table with namespace=default and table qualifier=t1
hbase> create 't1', {NAME => 'f1'}, {NAME => 'f2'}, {NAME => 'f3'}
hbase> # The above in shorthand would be the following:
hbase> create 't1', 'f1', 'f2', 'f3'
hbase> create 't1', {NAME => 'f1', VERSIONS => 1, TTL => 2592000, BLOCKCACHE => true}
hbase> create 't1', {NAME => 'f1', CONFIGURATION => {'hbase.hstore.blockingStoreFiles' => '10'}}
hbase> create 't1', {NAME => 'f1', IS_MOB => true, MOB_THRESHOLD => 1000000, MOB_COMPACT_PARTITION_POLICY => 'weekly'}

Table configuration options can be put at the end.
Examples:

hbase> create 'ns1:t1', 'f1', SPLITS => ['10', '20', '30', '40']
hbase> create 't1', 'f1', SPLITS => ['10', '20', '30', '40']
hbase> create 't1', 'f1', SPLITS_FILE => 'splits.txt', OWNER => 'johndoe'
hbase> create 't1', {NAME => 'f1', VERSIONS => 5}, METADATA => { 'mykey' => 'myvalue' }
hbase> # Optionally pre-split the table into NUMREGIONS, using
hbase> # SPLITALGO ("HexStringSplit", "UniformSplit" or classname)
hbase> create 't1', 'f1', {NUMREGIONS => 15, SPLITALGO => 'HexStringSplit'}
hbase> create 't1', 'f1', {NUMREGIONS => 15, SPLITALGO => 'HexStringSplit', REGION_REPLICATION => 2, CONFIGURATION => {'hbase.hregion.scan.loadColumnFamiliesOnDemand' => 'true'}}
hbase> create 't1', {NAME => 'f1', DFS_REPLICATION => 1}

You can also keep around a reference to the created table:

hbase> t1 = create 't1', 'f1'

Which gives you a reference to the table named 't1', on which you can then
call methods.

describe

Describe the named table. For example:
hbase> describe 't1'
hbase> describe 'ns1:t1'

Alternatively, you can use the abbreviated 'desc' for the same thing.
hbase> desc 't1'
hbase> desc 'ns1:t1'

disable

Start disable of named table:
hbase> disable 't1'
hbase> disable 'ns1:t1'

disable_all

drop

Drop the named table. Table must first be disabled:

hbase> drop 't1'
hbase> drop 'ns1:t1'

drop_all

Drop all of the tables matching the given regex:

hbase> drop_all 't.*'
hbase> drop_all 'ns:t.*'
hbase> drop_all 'ns:.*'

enable

Start enable of named table:

hbase> enable 't1'
hbase> enable 'ns1:t1'

enable_all

Enable all of the tables matching the given regex:

hbase> enable_all 't.*'
hbase> enable_all 'ns:t.*'
hbase> enable_all 'ns:.*'

exists

Does the named table exist?

hbase> exists 't1'
hbase> exists 'ns1:t1'

get_table

Get the given table name and return it as an actual object to
be manipulated by the user. See table.help for more information
on how to use the table.
Eg.

hbase> t1 = get_table 't1'
hbase> t1 = get_table 'ns1:t1'

returns the table named 't1' as a table object. You can then do

hbase> t1.help

which will then print the help for that table.

is_disabled

Is named table disabled? For example:
hbase> is_disabled 't1'
hbase> is_disabled 'ns1:t1'

is_enabled

Is named table enabled? For example:
hbase> is_enabled 't1'
hbase> is_enabled 'ns1:t1'

list

List all tables
TABLE
hbase> list
table1
table2

locate_region

Locate the region given a table name and a row-key

hbase> locate_region 'tableName', 'key0'

show_filters

hbas> show_filters
DependentColumnFilter
KeyOnlyFilter
ColumnCountGetFilter
SingleColumnValueFilter
PrefixFilter
SingleColumnValueExcludeFilter
FirstKeyOnlyFilter
ColumnRangeFilter
TimestampsFilter
FamilyFilter
QualifierFilter
ColumnPrefixFilter
RowFilter
MultipleColumnPrefixFilter
InclusiveStopFilter
PageFilter
ValueFilter
ColumnPaginationFilter

Namespace Commands Syntax and Usage

This group contains commands to alter & create the namespace of the HBase database.

CommandUsage & Examples

alter_namespace

Alter namespace properties.

To add/modify a property:

hbase> alter_namespace 'ns1', {METHOD => 'set', 'PROPERTY_NAME' => 'PROPERTY_VALUE'}

To delete a property:

hbase> alter_namespace 'ns1', {METHOD => 'unset', NAME=>'PROPERTY_NAME'}

create_namespace

Create namespace; pass namespace name,
and optionally a dictionary of namespace configuration.
Examples:

hbase> create_namespace 'ns1'
hbase> create_namespace 'ns1', {'PROPERTY_NAME'=>'PROPERTY_VALUE'}

describe_namespace

Describe the named namespace. For example:
hbase> describe_namespace 'ns1'

drop_namespace

Drop the named namespace. The namespace must be empty.

list_namespace

List all namespaces in hbase. Optional regular expression parameter could
be used to filter the output. Examples:

hbase> list_namespace
hbase> list_namespace 'abc.*'

list_namespace_tables

List all tables that are members of the namespace.
Examples:

hbase> list_namespace_tables 'ns1'
HBase Namespace Shell Commands Usage and Syntax

Tool Syntax and Usage

CommandsUsage & Examples

assign

Assign a region. Use with caution. If region already assigned,
this command will do a force reassign. For experts only.
Examples:

hbase> assign 'REGIONNAME'
hbase> assign 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME'

balance_switch

Enable/Disable balancer. Returns previous balancer state.
Examples:

hbase> balance_switch true
hbase> balance_switch false

balancer

Trigger the cluster balancer. Returns true if balancer ran and was able to
tell the region servers to unassign all the regions to balance (the re-assignment itself is async).
Otherwise false (Will not run if regions in transition).

Command: balancer_enabled
Query the balancer's state.
Examples:

hbase> balancer_enabled

catalogjanitor_enabled

Query for the CatalogJanitor state (enabled/disabled?)
Examples:

hbase> catalogjanitor_enabled

catalogjanitor_run

Catalog janitor command to run the (garbage collection) scan from command line.

hbase> catalogjanitor_run

catalogjanitor_switch

Enable/Disable CatalogJanitor. Returns previous CatalogJanitor state.
Examples:

hbase> catalogjanitor_switch true
hbase> catalogjanitor_switch false

close_region

Close a single region. Ask the master to close a region out on the cluster
or if 'SERVER_NAME' is supplied, ask the designated hosting regionserver to
close the region directly. Closing a region, the master expects 'REGIONNAME'
to be a fully qualified region name. When asking the hosting regionserver to
directly close a region, you pass the regions' encoded name only. A region
name looks like this:

TestTable,0094429456,1289497600452.527db22f95c8a9e0116f0cc13c680396.
or
Namespace:TestTable,0094429456,1289497600452.527db22f95c8a9e0116f0cc13c680396.

The trailing period is part of the regionserver name. A region's encoded name
is the hash at the end of a region name; e.g. 527db22f95c8a9e0116f0cc13c680396
(without the period). A 'SERVER_NAME' is its host, port plus startcode. For
example: host187.example.com,60020,1289493121758 (find servername in master ui
or when you do detailed status in shell). This command will end up running
close on the region hosting regionserver. The close is done without the
master's involvement (It will not know of the close). Once closed, region will
stay closed. Use assign to reopen/reassign. Use unassign or move to assign
the region elsewhere on cluster. Use with caution. For experts only.
Examples:

hbase> close_region 'REGIONNAME'
hbase> close_region 'REGIONNAME', 'SERVER_NAME'
hbase> close_region 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME'
hbase> close_region 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME', 'SERVER_NAME'

compact

Compact all regions in passed table or pass a region row
to compact an individual region. You can also compact a single column
family within a region.
Examples:
Compact all regions in a table:
hbase> compact 'ns1:t1'
hbase> compact 't1'
Compact an entire region:
hbase> compact 'r1'
Compact only a column family within a region:
hbase> compact 'r1', 'c1'
Compact a column family within a table:
hbase> compact 't1', 'c1'

compact_mob

Run compaction on a mob enabled column family
or all mob enabled column families within a table
Examples:
Compact a column family within a table:
hbase> compact_mob 't1', 'c1'
Compact all mob enabled column families
hbase> compact_mob 't1'

compact_rs

Compact all regions on passed regionserver.
Examples:
Compact all regions on a regionserver:
hbase> compact_rs 'host187.example.com,60020'
or
hbase> compact_rs 'host187.example.com,60020,1289493121758'
Major compact all regions on a regionserver:
hbase> compact_rs 'host187.example.com,60020,1289493121758', true

flush

Flush all regions in passed table or pass a region row to
flush an individual region. For example:

hbase> flush 'TABLENAME'
hbase> flush 'REGIONNAME'
hbase> flush 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME'

major_compact

Run major compaction on passed table or pass a region row
to major compact an individual region. To compact a single
column family within a region specify the region name
followed by the column family name.
Examples:
Compact all regions in a table:
hbase> major_compact 't1'
hbase> major_compact 'ns1:t1'
Compact an entire region:
hbase> major_compact 'r1'
Compact a single column family within a region:
hbase> major_compact 'r1', 'c1'
Compact a single column family within a table:
hbase> major_compact 't1', 'c1'

major_compact_mob

Run major compaction on a mob enabled column family
or all mob enabled column families within a table
Examples:
Compact a column family within a table:
hbase> major_compact_mob 't1', 'c1'
Compact all mob enabled column families within a table
hbase> major_compact_mob 't1'

merge_region

Merge two regions. Passing 'true' as the optional third parameter will force
a merge ('force' merges regardless else merge will fail unless passed
adjacent regions. 'force' is for expert use only).

NOTE: You must pass the encoded region name, not the full region name so
this command is a little different from other region operations. The encoded
region name is the hash suffix on region names: e.g. if the region name were
TestTable,0094429456,1289497600452.527db22f95c8a9e0116f0cc13c680396. then
the encoded region name portion is 527db22f95c8a9e0116f0cc13c680396

Examples:

hbase> merge_region 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME', 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME'
hbase> merge_region 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME', 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME', true

move

Move a region. Optionally specify target regionserver else we choose one
at random. NOTE: You pass the encoded region name, not the region name so
this command is a little different to the others. The encoded region name
is the hash suffix on region names: e.g. if the region name were
TestTable,0094429456,1289497600452.527db22f95c8a9e0116f0cc13c680396. then
the encoded region name portion is 527db22f95c8a9e0116f0cc13c680396
A server name is its host, port plus startcode. For example:
host187.example.com,60020,1289493121758
Examples:

hbase> move 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME'
hbase> move 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME', 'SERVER_NAME'

normalize

Trigger region normalizer for all tables which have NORMALIZATION_ENABLED flag set. Returns true
if normalizer ran successfully, false otherwise. Note that this command has no effect
if region normalizer is disabled (make sure it's turned on using 'normalizer_switch' command).

Examples:

hbase> normalize

normalizer_enabled

Query the state of region normalizer.
Examples:

hbase> normalizer_enabled

normalizer_switch

Enable/Disable region normalizer. Returns previous normalizer state.
When normalizer is enabled, it handles all tables with 'NORMALIZATION_ENABLED' => true.
Examples:

hbase> normalizer_switch true
hbase> normalizer_switch false

split

Split entire table or pass a region to split individual region. With the
second parameter, you can specify an explicit split key for the region.
Examples:
split 'tableName'
split 'namespace:tableName'
split 'regionName' # format: 'tableName,startKey,id'
split 'tableName', 'splitKey'
split 'regionName', 'splitKey'

trace

Start or Stop tracing using HTrace.
Always returns true if tracing is running, otherwise false.
If the first argument is 'start', new span is started.
If the first argument is 'stop', current running span is stopped.
('stop' returns false on success.)
If the first argument is 'status', just returns if or not tracing is running.
On 'start'-ing, you can optionally pass the name of span as the second argument.
The default name of span is 'HBaseShell'.
Repeating 'start' does not start nested span.

Examples:

hbase> trace 'start'
hbase> trace 'status'
hbase> trace 'stop'

hbase> trace 'start', 'MySpanName'
hbase> trace 'stop'

unassign

Unassign a region. Unassign will close region in current location and then
reopen it again. Pass 'true' to force the unassignment ('force' will clear
all in-memory state in master before the reassign. If results in
double assignment use hbck -fix to resolve. To be used by experts).
Use with caution. For expert use only. Examples:

hbase> unassign 'REGIONNAME'
hbase> unassign 'REGIONNAME', true
hbase> unassign 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME'
hbase> unassign 'ENCODED_REGIONNAME', true

wal_roll

Roll the log writer. That is, start writing log messages to a new file.
The name of the regionserver should be given as the parameter. A
'server_name' is the host, port plus startcode of a regionserver. For
example: host187.example.com,60020,1289493121758 (find servername in
master ui or when you do detailed status in shell)

zk_dump

Dump status of HBase cluster as seen by ZooKeeper.

Replication Syntax and Usage

Note: In order to use these tools, hbase.replication must be set to true and commands in these groups are mainly used to add or remove a peer from an HBase cluster.

CommandsUsage & Examples

add_peer

A peer can either be another HBase cluster or a custom replication endpoint. In either case an id
must be specified to identify the peer.

For a HBase cluster peer, a cluster key must be provided and is composed like this:
hbase.zookeeper.quorum:hbase.zookeeper.property.clientPort:zookeeper.znode.parent
This gives a full path for HBase to connect to another HBase cluster. An optional parameter for
table column families identifies which column families will be replicated to the peer cluster.
Examples:

hbase> add_peer '1', "server1.cie.com:2181:/hbase"
hbase> add_peer '2', "zk1,zk2,zk3:2182:/hbase-prod"
hbase> add_peer '3', "zk4,zk5,zk6:11000:/hbase-test", "table1; table2:cf1; table3:cf1,cf2"
hbase> add_peer '4', CLUSTER_KEY => "server1.cie.com:2181:/hbase"
hbase> add_peer '5', CLUSTER_KEY => "zk1,zk2,zk3:2182:/hbase-prod",
TABLE_CFS => { "table1" => [], "ns2:table2" => ["cf1"], "ns3:table3" => ["cf1", "cf2"] }

For a custom replication endpoint, the ENDPOINT_CLASSNAME can be provided. Two optional arguments
are DATA and CONFIG which can be specified to set different either the peer_data or configuration
for the custom replication endpoint. Table column families is optional and can be specified with
the key TABLE_CFS.

hbase> add_peer '6', ENDPOINT_CLASSNAME => 'org.apache.hadoop.hbase.MyReplicationEndpoint'
hbase> add_peer '7', ENDPOINT_CLASSNAME => 'org.apache.hadoop.hbase.MyReplicationEndpoint',
DATA => { "key1" => 1 }
hbase> add_peer '8', ENDPOINT_CLASSNAME => 'org.apache.hadoop.hbase.MyReplicationEndpoint',
CONFIG => { "config1" => "value1", "config2" => "value2" }
hbase> add_peer '9', ENDPOINT_CLASSNAME => 'org.apache.hadoop.hbase.MyReplicationEndpoint',
DATA => { "key1" => 1 }, CONFIG => { "config1" => "value1", "config2" => "value2" },
hbase> add_peer '10', ENDPOINT_CLASSNAME => 'org.apache.hadoop.hbase.MyReplicationEndpoint',
TABLE_CFS => { "table1" => [], "ns2:table2" => ["cf1"], "ns3:table3" => ["cf1", "cf2"] }
hbase> add_peer '11', ENDPOINT_CLASSNAME => 'org.apache.hadoop.hbase.MyReplicationEndpoint',
DATA => { "key1" => 1 }, CONFIG => { "config1" => "value1", "config2" => "value2" },
TABLE_CFS => { "table1" => [], "table2" => ["cf1"], "table3" => ["cf1", "cf2"] }

Note: Either CLUSTER_KEY or ENDPOINT_CLASSNAME must be specified but not both.

append_peer_tableCFs

Append a replicable table-cf config for the specified peer
Examples:

# append a table / table-cf to be replicable for a peer
hbase> append_peer_tableCFs '2', { "ns1:table4" => ["cfA", "cfB"] }

disable_peer

Stops the replication stream to the specified cluster, but still
keeps track of new edits to replicate.

Examples:

hbase> disable_peer '1'

disable_table_replication

Disable a table's replication switch.

Examples:

hbase> disable_table_replication 'table_name'

enable_peer

Restarts the replication to the specified peer cluster,
continuing from where it was disabled.

Examples:

hbase> enable_peer '1'

enable_table_replication

Enable a table's replication switch.

Examples:

hbase> enable_table_replication 'table_name'

get_peer_config

Outputs the cluster key, replication endpoint class (if present), and any replication configuration parameters

list_peer_configs

No-argument method that outputs the replication peer configuration for each peer defined on this cluster.

list_peers

List all replication peer clusters.
hbase> list_peers

list_replicated_tables

List all the tables and column families replicated from this cluster

hbase> list_replicated_tables
hbase> list_replicated_tables 'abc.*'

remove_peer

Stops the specified replication stream and deletes all the meta
information kept about it. Examples:

hbase> remove_peer '1'

remove_peer_tableCFs

Remove a table / table-cf from the table-cfs config for the specified peer
Examples:

# Remove a table / table-cf from the replicable table-cfs for a peer
hbase> remove_peer_tableCFs '2', { "ns1:table1" => [] }
hbase> remove_peer_tableCFs '2', { "ns1:table1" => ["cf1"] }

set_peer_tableCFs

Set the replicable table-cf config for the specified peer
Examples:

# set all tables to be replicable for a peer
hbase> set_peer_tableCFs '1', ""
hbase> set_peer_tableCFs '1'
# set table / table-cf to be replicable for a peer, for a table without
# an explicit column-family list, all replicable column-families (with
# replication_scope == 1) will be replicated
hbase> set_peer_tableCFs '2', { "ns1:table1" => [],
"ns2:table2" => ["cf1", "cf2"],
"ns3:table3" => ["cfA", "cfB"] }

show_peer_tableCFs

Show replicable table-cf config for the specified peer.

hbase> show_peer_tableCFs

update_peer_config

A peer can either be another HBase cluster or a custom replication endpoint. In either case an id
must be specified to identify the peer. This command does not interrupt processing on an enabled replication peer.

Two optional arguments are DATA and CONFIG which can be specified to set different values for either
the peer_data or configuration for a custom replication endpoint. Any existing values not updated by this command
are left unchanged.

CLUSTER_KEY, REPLICATION_ENDPOINT, and TABLE_CFs cannot be updated with this command.
To update TABLE_CFs, see the append_peer_tableCFs and remove_peer_tableCFs commands.

hbase> update_peer_config '1', DATA => { "key1" => 1 }
hbase> update_peer_config '2', CONFIG => { "config1" => "value1", "config2" => "value2" }
hbase> update_peer_config '3', DATA => { "key1" => 1 }, CONFIG => { "config1" => "value1", "config2" => "value2" },

Snapshot Shell commands

This group of commands is used to take the snapshot of the database at any given time.

CommandsUsage & Examples
clone_snapshotCreate a new table by cloning the snapshot content.
There're no copies of data involved.
And writing on the newly created table will not influence the snapshot data.

Examples:
hbase> clone_snapshot 'snapshotName', 'tableName'
hbase> clone_snapshot 'snapshotName', 'namespace:tableName'
delete_all_snapshotDelete all of the snapshots matching the given regex. Examples:

hbase> delete_all_snapshot 's.*'

delete_snapshotDelete a specified snapshot. Examples:

hbase> delete_snapshot 'snapshotName',
list_snapshotsList all snapshots taken (by printing the names and relative information).
Optional regular expression parameter could be used to filter the output
by snapshot name.

Examples:
hbase> list_snapshots
hbase> list_snapshots 'abc.*'
restore_snapshotRestore a specified snapshot.
The restore will replace the content of the original table,
bringing back the content to the snapshot state.
The table must be disabled.

Examples:
hbase> restore_snapshot 'snapshotName'
snapshotTake a snapshot of specified table. Examples:

hbase> snapshot 'sourceTable', 'snapshotName'
hbase> snapshot 'namespace:sourceTable', 'snapshotName', {SKIP_FLUSH => true}

Configuration Syntax and Usage

CommandsUsage & Examples

update_all_config

Reload a subset of configuration on all servers in the cluster. See
http://hbase.apache.org/book.html?dyn_config for more details. Here is how
you would run the command in the hbase shell:
hbase> update_all_config

update_config

Reload a subset of configuration on server 'servername' where servername is
host, port plus startcode. For example: host187.example.com,60020,1289493121758
See http://hbase.apache.org/book.html?dyn_config for more details. Here is how
you would run the command in the hbase shell:
hbase> update_config 'servername'

Quota Syntax and Usage

CommandsUsage & Examples

list_quotas

List the quota settings added to the system.
You can filter the result based on USER, TABLE, or NAMESPACE.

For example:

hbase> list_quotas
hbase> list_quotas USER => 'bob.*'
hbase> list_quotas USER => 'bob.*', TABLE => 't1'
hbase> list_quotas USER => 'bob.*', NAMESPACE => 'ns.*'
hbase> list_quotas TABLE => 'myTable'
hbase> list_quotas NAMESPACE => 'ns.*'

set_quota

Set a quota for a user, table, or namespace.
Syntax : set_quota TYPE => ,

TYPE => THROTTLE
User can either set quota on read, write or on both the requests together(i.e., read+write)
The read, write, or read+write(default throttle type) request limit can be expressed using
the form 100req/sec, 100req/min and the read, write, read+write(default throttle type) limit
can be expressed using the form 100k/sec, 100M/min with (B, K, M, G, T, P) as valid size unit
and (sec, min, hour, day) as valid time unit.
Currently the throttle limit is per machine - a limit of 100req/min
means that each machine can execute 100req/min.

For example:

hbase> set_quota TYPE => THROTTLE, USER => 'u1', LIMIT => '10req/sec'
hbase> set_quota TYPE => THROTTLE, THROTTLE_TYPE => READ, USER => 'u1', LIMIT => '10req/sec'

hbase> set_quota TYPE => THROTTLE, USER => 'u1', LIMIT => '10M/sec'
hbase> set_quota TYPE => THROTTLE, THROTTLE_TYPE => WRITE, USER => 'u1', LIMIT => '10M/sec'

hbase> set_quota TYPE => THROTTLE, USER => 'u1', TABLE => 't2', LIMIT => '5K/min'
hbase> set_quota TYPE => THROTTLE, USER => 'u1', NAMESPACE => 'ns2', LIMIT => NONE

hbase> set_quota TYPE => THROTTLE, NAMESPACE => 'ns1', LIMIT => '10req/sec'
hbase> set_quota TYPE => THROTTLE, TABLE => 't1', LIMIT => '10M/sec'
hbase> set_quota TYPE => THROTTLE, THROTTLE_TYPE => WRITE, TABLE => 't1', LIMIT => '10M/sec'
hbase> set_quota TYPE => THROTTLE, USER => 'u1', LIMIT => NONE
hbase> set_quota TYPE => THROTTLE, THROTTLE_TYPE => WRITE, USER => 'u1', LIMIT => NONE

hbase> set_quota USER => 'u1', GLOBAL_BYPASS => true

HBase Security Syntax and Usage

Note: Security commands are only applicable if running with the AccessController coprocessor. These HBase shell commands are mostly used by an admin to make & provide security to the database and tables.

CommandsUsage & Examples
grantGrant users specific rights.

permissions is either zero or more letters from the set "RWXCA".
READ('R'), WRITE('W'), EXEC('X'), CREATE('C'), ADMIN('A')

Note: Groups and users are granted access in the same way, but groups are prefixed with an '@'
character. In the same way, tables and namespaces are specified, but namespaces are
prefixed with an '@' character.

For example:

hbase> grant 'bobsmith', 'RWXCA'
hbase> grant '@admins', 'RWXCA'
hbase> grant 'bobsmith', 'RWXCA', '@ns1'
hbase> grant 'bobsmith', 'RW', 't1', 'f1', 'col1'
hbase> grant 'bobsmith', 'RW', 'ns1:t1', 'f1', 'col1'
list_security_capabilitiesList supported security capabilities

Example:
hbase> list_security_capabilities
revokeRevoke a user's access rights.

Note: Groups and users access are revoked in the same way, but groups are prefixed with an '@'
character. In the same way, tables and namespaces are specified, but namespaces are
prefixed with an '@' character.

For example:

hbase> revoke 'bobsmith'
hbase> revoke '@admins'
hbase> revoke 'bobsmith', '@ns1'
hbase> revoke 'bobsmith', 't1', 'f1', 'col1'
hbase> revoke 'bobsmith', 'ns1:t1', 'f1', 'col1'
user_permissionShow all permissions for the particular user.
Syntax : user_permission table

Note: A namespace must always precede with '@' character.

For example:

hbase> user_permission
hbase> user_permission '@ns1'
hbase> user_permission '@.*'
hbase> user_permission '@^[a-c].*'
hbase> user_permission 'table1'
hbase> user_permission 'namespace1:table1'
hbase> user_permission '.*'
hbase> user_permission '^[A-C].*'

Procedure Syntax and Usage

NameProcedure Hbase Shell Commands Usage

abort_procedure

Given a procedure Id (and optional boolean may_interrupt_if_running parameter,
default is true), abort a procedure in hbase. Use with caution. Some procedures
might not be abortable. For experts only.

If this command is accepted and the procedure is in the process of aborting,
it will return true; if the procedure could not be aborted (eg. procedure
does not exist, or procedure already completed or abort will cause corruption),
this command will return false.

Examples:

hbase> abort_procedure proc_id
hbase> abort_procedure proc_id, true
hbase> abort_procedure proc_id, false

list_procedures

List all procedures in hbase. For example:

hbase> list_procedures

Visibility Label Syntax and Usage

CommandsUsage & Examples

add_labels

Add a set of visibility labels.
Syntax : add_labels [label1, label2]

For example:

hbase> add_labels ['SECRET','PRIVATE']

clear_auths

Clear visibility labels from a user or group
Syntax : clear_auths 'user',[label1, label2]

For example:

hbase> clear_auths 'user1', ['SECRET','PRIVATE']
hbase> clear_auths '@group1', ['SECRET','PRIVATE']

get_auths

Get the visibility labels set for a particular user or group
Syntax : get_auths 'user'

For example:

hbase> get_auths 'user1'
hbase> get_auths '@group1'

list_labels

List the visibility labels defined in the system.
Optional regular expression parameter could be used to filter the labels being returned.
Syntax : list_labels

For example:

hbase> list_labels 'secret.*'
hbase> list_labels

set_auths

Add a set of visibility labels for a user or group
Syntax : set_auths 'user',[label1, label2]

For example:

hbase> set_auths 'user1', ['SECRET','PRIVATE']
hbase> set_auths '@group1', ['SECRET','PRIVATE']

set_visibility

Set the visibility expression on one or more existing cells.

Pass table name, visibility expression, and a dictionary containing
scanner specifications. Scanner specifications may include one or more
of: TIMERANGE, FILTER, STARTROW, STOPROW, ROWPREFIXFILTER, TIMESTAMP, or COLUMNS

If no columns are specified, all columns will be included.
To include all members of a column family, leave the qualifier empty as in
'col_family:'.

The filter can be specified in two ways:
1. Using a filterString - more information on this is available in the
Filter Language document attached to the HBASE-4176 JIRA
2. Using the entire package name of the filter.

Examples:

hbase> set_visibility 't1', 'A|B', {COLUMNS => ['c1', 'c2']}
hbase> set_visibility 't1', '(A&B)|C', {COLUMNS => 'c1',
TIMERANGE => [1303668804, 1303668904]}
hbase> set_visibility 't1', 'A&B&C', {ROWPREFIXFILTER => 'row2',
FILTER => "(QualifierFilter (>=, 'binary:xyz')) AND
(TimestampsFilter ( 123, 456))"}

This command will only affect existing cells and is expected to be mainly
useful for feature testing and functional verification.

Rsgroup HBase Shell Commands

Note: The rsgroup Coprocessor Endpoint must be enabled on the Master else commands fail with:
UnknownProtocolException: No registered Master Coprocessor Endpoint found for RSGroupAdminService

CommandsUsage & Examples

add_rsgroup

Create a new RegionServer group.

Example:

hbase> add_rsgroup 'my_group'

balance_rsgroup

Balance a RegionServer group

Example:

hbase> balance_rsgroup 'my_group'

get_rsgroup

Get a RegionServer group's information.

Example:

hbase> get_rsgroup 'default'

get_server_rsgroup

Get the group name the given RegionServer is a member of.

Example:

hbase> get_server_rsgroup 'server1:port1'

get_table_rsgroup

Get the RegionServer group name the given table is a member of.

Example:

hbase> get_table_rsgroup 'myTable'

list_rsgroups

List all RegionServer groups. Optional regular expression parameter can
be used to filter the output.

Example:

hbase> list_rsgroups
hbase> list_rsgroups 'abc.*'

move_servers_rsgroup

Reassign a region server from one RSGroup to another.

hbase> move_servers_rsgroup 'dest',['server1:port','server2:port']

move_tables_rsgroup

Reassign tables from one RSGroup to another.

hbase> move_tables_rsgroup 'dest',['table1','table2']

remove_rsgroup

Remove a RegionServer group.

hbase> remove_rsgroup 'my_group'

Conclusion:

We have seen HBase shell commands are broken down into several different groups, each serves a different purpose and also have seen examples, usage, and description of each command to interact with HBase. I hope it helps !!

Happy Learning !!

NNK

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